Golf Course Management

MAR 2015

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

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03.15 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 87 fuel was applied to the center of each surface, resulting in turf damage that approached the margin of the 4-inch (10-centimeter) diameter evaluation area; in the second experiment, the application volume was decreased to 10 mil - liliters on each 1.0-square-foot treatment area. Total rainfall also differed between the frst (1.4 inches [3.55 centimeters]) and second (4.4 inches [11.17 centimeters]) experiment. These differences should be noted when attempting to compare results across experiments. For creeping bentgrass fairways, there were no signifcant differences in percent relative green cover by fuel type for any of the four weekly comparisons (Figure 3, top). There was a signifcant independent effect for fuel tem - perature, with fuels applied at 165 F resulting in a lower percent relative green cover (overall mean 79%) than fuels applied at 90 F (over - all mean 84%). Interestingly, there was not a signifcant interaction between fuel tempera - ture and number of weeks post-application; the decrease in percent relative green cover for fuels applied at 165 F persisted throughout the study period. On bermudagrass fairways, there were sig - nifcant differences in percent relative green cover by fuel type in each of the four com - parisons by week (Figure 3, middle). In each comparison, percent relative green cover was signifcantly lower for plots treated with pe - troleum diesel, intermediate for those treated with B20 and higher for those treated with B100. By week 6, relative green cover for ber - mudagrass was over 90% for each fuel type with B100-treated bermudagrass at 99% rel - ative green cover. There was no signifcant main effect for fuel temperature on percent relative green cover for bermudagrass. On zoysiagrass fairways, there were signif - cant differences in percent relative green cover by fuel type each week (Figure 3, bottom). In weeks 2, 4 and 6, percent relative green cover was signifcantly lower for plots treated with petroleum diesel, intermediate for those treated with B20 and higher for those treated with B100. By week 6, B100-treated zoysia - grass had a relative green cover of 96%, com- pared to 75% for B20 and 59% for petroleum diesel. There was no signifcant main effect for fuel temperature on percent relative green cover for zoysiagrass. Implications The results of this study yielded fairly con- sistent results across turfgrass surfaces and ex- Figure 3. Percent relative green cover by week for petroleum diesel (PD), 20% biodiesel (B20) and 100% biodiesel (B100) applied at 10 milliliters on creeping bentgrass, bermudagrass and zoysiagrass fairways. Within each species and week, bars with the same letter are not statistically different. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 PD B20 B100 % relative green cover Week 1 Week 2 Week 4 Week 6 Creeping bentgrass Bermudagrass Zoysiagrass a a a a a a a a a a a a b a a c b a c b a c b a b a a c b a c b a c b a 10-milliliter applications

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