Golf Course Management

JUL 2014

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

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86 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 07.14 Multiguard sequences in spring and/or fall. This recommendation may be different for other regions. One of the mysteries about Multiguard was that often in our feld trials, even when we observed turf improvement, we were not able to observe signifcant reductions in nematode counts. For example, in the three trials shown in Figure 3, we observed no signifcant nema - tode reductions despite having signifcant turf improvement. Therefore, we conducted ad - ditional trials on bermudagrass tees, studying the effects of Multiguard Protect on numbers of sting nematodes at different soil depths. Some of the results from these trials are shown in Figure 4. In the top 2 inches (5 centime - ters) of the soil profle, Multiguard was not ef- fective against sting nematodes. However, at depths of 2 to 4 inches (5 to 10 centimeters) and 4 to 6 inches (10 to 15 centimeters) (data not shown), Multiguard reduced numbers of sting nematodes after two applications of the maximum labeled rate (1). These results indicate that Multiguard Protect is effective against sting nematodes, but not in the top 2 inches of soil. We know that furfural is rapidly broken down by soil microbes, particularly in aero - bic conditions. Therefore, we hypothesize that because the top portion of the soil profle has high microbial activity and aerobic con - ditions, the furfural gets broken down too quickly in that area to have the desired effects. In lower portions of the soil profle, where less oxygen is available and microbial activity is lower, the furfural should stay around longer and have greater impact on nematodes. The reason that we were unable to observe signif - cant nematode reductions in many of our ear- lier trials is likely because we typically sample to a depth of 4 inches, which includes the in - effective zone. This likely dilutes the overall observable effects. Conclusions In summary, Multiguard Protect is an ef- fective management tool for nematodes on turf, particularly ectoparasitic species like sting nematode. However, it must be used correctly in order to be effective. Before treat - ment, the soil must be moist to prevent phyto- toxicity, so superintendents should pre-irrigate if necessary. After application, irrigating im - mediately with ¼ inch of water will move the Figure 3. Effects of three spring applications of Multiguard Protect on the percent of turf green cover of (A) Tifdwarf, (B) Jones Dwarf and (C) Champion bermudagrass greens in Citra, Fla. Stars indicate application dates. Asterisks (*, **, ***) indicate values that are signifcantly different from the untreated plots at P ≤ 0.1, 0.05 and 0.01, respectively. Spring applications on bermuda greens 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 A B C Untreated Multiguard % turfgrass green cover * * ** *** *** *** ** ** 1 Apr 8 Jun 28 Feb 7 May 29 Mar 5 Jun 29 Apr 25 May 12 Mar 26 Mar 10 Apr 24 Apr 080-089_July14_TechwellCuttingEdge copy.indd 86 6/17/14 2:32 PM

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