Golf Course Management

MAY 2014

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

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62 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 05.14 Sometimes, the problem is you A Canadian superintendent applies his study of bias in decision-making to golf course management. Decision-making is such a common occurrence that it often goes unnoticed: What shall I have for breakfast? What route shall I take to work? The blue shirt, the black shirt or the darker blue shirt today? For a golf course superintendent, many daily decisions pass with little thought and likely little impact. Other decisions can have signifcant and far-reaching impacts on the health of the turf, the performance of the golf course as a business or simply the appearance or presentation of the golf course. Some decisions are made with the assumption that they will have little impact and they turn out to have a long-lasting legacy, positive or negative. For a superintendent who has to make decisions while managing an ever-changing natural environment, the decision- making process can become quite complex as many different — often opposing — infuences are considered. Mark McKinney details the intricate, often mutually exclusive relationship among these forces in "The Superintendent Triangle" (USGA Green Section Record, Vol. 5, Sept. 20, 2013) and offers numerous examples to be found in golf course management: the decision to mow greens following a day of heavy rain may elevate the satisfaction of the players in an event that day, but at an immediate cost to the health of the turf; or the decision to withhold an application of fungicide to fairways will reduce the expenses that the business incurs that month, but at a cost to the overall appearance and playability of the golf course. The reality is that all decision-making involves an element of risk that needs to be identifed By David J. Kuypers AT THE TURN (business) Some decisions are made with the assumption that they will have little impact and they turn out to have a long-lasting legacy, positive or negative. Photo illustrations by Shutterstock.com 062-067_May14_Decisions.indd 62 4/16/14 2:49 PM

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