Golf Course Management

APR 2014

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

Issue link: http://gcmdigital.gcsaa.org/i/284784

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90 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 04.14 Effects of summer cultivation and fertilization timing on large patch in zoysiagrass Large patch disease in zoysiagrass has become more of a concern as use of the turfgrass has increased on golf courses. Zoysiagrass (Zoysia japonica and Z. ma- trella) is being used increasingly often in golf course fairways and greens. Large patch, caused by R izoctonia solani AG 2-2 LP, is a common and severe disease of zoysiagrass. Patches range in size from a few feet across to 20 feet or more in diameter. On individ - ual plants, the leaf blades develop a yellow- orange color with rotting on the leaf sheaths. Large patch symptom development in zoysia - grass is favored by relatively cool and humid weather. In Kansas, large patch symptoms develop primarily in April-May and occa - sionally in September-October. Compacted and poorly drained soils and excessive and prolonged wetness near the leaf surface are optimal conditions for the development of large patch symptoms. Currently, large patch is primarily man - aged by fungicide application during fall and/ or spring. Cultural management practices do not provide an acceptable level of disease control, and few studies have examined the effects of cultural practices. Previous stud - ies (2) have examined the effects of mowing height, nitrogen source and nitrogen applica - tion rates on large patch development and se- This research was funded in part by the United States Golf Association. Ken Obasa, Ph.D. Jack Fry, Ph.D. Dale Bremer, Ph.D. Rodney St. John, Ph.D. Megan Kennelly, Ph.D. Patches in large patch disease range in size from a few feet across to 20 feet or more in diameter. Photos by Megan Kennelly On individual zoysiagrass plants affected by large patch disease, the leaf blades develop a yellow- orange color with rotting on the leaf sheaths. 090-101_April14_TechwellCuttingEdge.indd 90 3/18/14 2:54 PM

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