Golf Course Management

FEB 2014

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

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96 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 02.14 overall season mean for each year; a quality index score (the number of rating events at which the treatment had a quality mean score of 6.0 or greater); and the percentage of the total of yearly ratings that achieved a mean quality score of 6.0 or greater (Table 3). In ad - dition, the plot composition of the turf at a noteworthy spring transition is also provided. These data show how much of the plot surface in each treatment is composed of either living perennial ryegrass, living paspalum or necrotic straw (dead leaves/stems) during a critical stage of spring transition. Results and discussion The treatments reported include: group 1 — those that had the best quality means for two or three years; group 2 — treatments that included no chemical treatments, but received only mechanical treatments; and group 3 — treatments that received only a chemical treat - ment. These three groups represent a sample of 20 of 42 total treatments that address the questions of what the results are from (a) me - chanical manipulation alone, (b) chemicals alone, and (c) the combination of mechani - cal and chemical conditions that, in fact, pro- Quality≥6.0 (No. events) † Quality ≥ 6.0 (% occurrence) ‡ Quality average for the year § Year 3 Year 2 Year 1 Year 3 Year 2 Year 1 Year 3 Year 2 Year 1 7 ratings 7 ratings 10 ratings 7 ratings 7 ratings 10 ratings Group 1: Best treatments Trt. No. 3 4 6 6 57 86 60 6.3 7.3 6.2 19 6 6 9 86 86 90 7.1. 7.1 6.7 23 6 6 5 86 86 50 6.2 6.9 6.4 27 4 6 8 57 86 80 6.8 7 5.5 31 4 7 7 57 100 70 6.8 7.3 6.4 28 4 4 7 57 57 70 6.3 5.8 5.4 33 6 4 5 86 57 50 5.6 5.5 6.3 29 5 6 5 71 86 50 6.3 7.1 6 17 5 6 5 71 86 50 6.3 7 6.2 36 5 2 5 71 29 50 5.8 4.9 5.9 Group 2: Nonchemical (mechanical) treatments only Trt. No. 11 4 5 5 57 71 50 5.9 6.4 6.2 9 1 2 6 14 29 60 6.2 4.5 5.4 3 4 6 6 57 86 60 6.3 7.3 6.2 1 2 5 5 29 71 50 5.9 6.6 5.8 7 4 3 4 57 43 40 5.5 5.5 6.1 5 1 2 4 14 29 40 5.6 4.8 5.5. Group3: Chemical treatments only Trt. No. 33 6 3 5 86 42 50 6.3 5.5 5.6 34 4 2 5 58 29 50 6.2 4.6 5.7 35 2 3 5 29 42 50 4.8 5.3 5.4 36 5 2 5 72 29 50 5.9 4.9 5.8 Test mean †† N.A. N.A. N.A. 5.6 5.5 5.6 Quality and percent cover after preparation for overseeding Table 3. Quality index occurrence; percent of all occurrences in which treatments had minimal quality index values; annual treatment quality averages; percent plot perrenial ryegrass, straw and seashore paspalum of Sea Isle 1 after overseeding preparation techniques of adjusted mowing heights, vertical mowing and herbicides used in canopy preparation for overseeding of Sea Isle 1 seashore paspalum. Values are the mean of four observations. Select treatments are displayed to show best results and comparative effects. Note. In all cases, year 3 = 2012, year 2 = 2011 and year 1 = 2010. † Quality ≥ 6.0: Number of rating events per year that a treatment mean for quality was 6.0 or greater out of all rating events per year. ‡ Quality ≥ 6.0: Percentage of all rating events in that year that a treatment mean for quality was 6.0 or greater. § Quality average: Mean of each treatment for quality on that date; quality is rated on a scale of 1-9, where 1 = dead turf, 4 = poor, 5 = marginal, 6 = acceptable, 9 = best possible. Values are the mean of four replications. 094-105_Feb14_TechwellCuttingEdge.indd 96 1/17/14 11:48 AM

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