Golf Course Management

DEC 2013

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

Issue link: http://gcmdigital.gcsaa.org/i/215757

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gcm ex t ra Photos courtesy of Dan Leiss The rating game Looking to outfit your maintenance facility with a new air compressor? Here's what to look for in compressor specifications as you start your shopping. Dan Leiss 70 GCM December 2013 There are plenty of options when you are looking to purchase an air compressor for your golf course maintenance facility. In fact, it may seem as if there are too many options. What makes the situation even more complicated is that a true side-by-side comparison between compressors is diffcult to conduct, since manufacturers often rate their specifcations differently from one another. However, there are a few simple factors to keep in mind that can help you fnd the right compressor for your particular situation, even when manufacturers seem to be playing the rating game. Coming to terms When it comes to compressors, there are three main specifcations that determine performance: CFM, PSI and horsepower. CFM, or cubic feet per minute, measures the volume of air that a compressor delivers. PSI, or pounds per square inch, indicates the amount of pressure behind the air. Horsepower, of course, represents the power that the engine or motor produces to turn the pump. It seems simple enough but, unfortunately, things can get a bit more complicated. That's because there are multiple methods for rating the CFM and horsepower of a compressor. Even more, there are other considerations, such as service factor and duty cycle, that can also come into play when determining performance. Therefore, people should come to terms with all the jargon, so they aren't misled into making poor purchase decisions. Speaking volumes The frst and most commonly misunderstood compressor rating is CFM. In theory, this could be determined by multiplying the cylinder bore by the stroke and

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