Golf Course Management

AUG 2019

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

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68 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 08.19 Soil sources Chemical properties of soils from all locations Location Soil Existing plant Fort Collins, Colo. Nunn clay loam wheat Bernalillo, N.M. Pinavetes loamy fine sand mixture of Kentucky bluegrass and ryegrass Tecumseh, Okla. Stephenville fine sandy loam common bermudagrass Lincoln, Neb. Zook silty clay loam corn Columbus, Ohio Brookston silty clay loam mixture of tall fescue, Kentucky bluegrass and ryegrass Raleigh, N.C. Cecil sandy loam tall fescue Sumter, S.C. Troup loamy fine sand hardwood forest Jay, Fla. Fuquay loamy sand St. Augustinegrass Davie, Fla. Hallandale fine sand bahiagrass Auburn, Ala. Marvyn loamy sand Tifway bermudagrass Starkville, Miss. Marietta fine sandy loam centipedegrass Table 1. Location, soil, and existing plant from soil used in the incubation. Parameter Location Colo. N.M. Okla. Neb. Ohio N.C. S.C. N. Fla. S. Fla. Ala. Miss. Mehlich III content (milligrams/kilogram) Phosphorus (P) 29.0 23.0 18.0 95.0 25.0 13.0 50.0 33.0 20.0 73.0 87.0 Potassium (K) 414.0 191.0 95.0 395.0 84.0 36.0 47.0 38.0 14.0 31.0 92.0 Calcium (Ca) 3771.0 7609.0 992.0 2515.0 2171.0 1179.0 1091.0 481.0 1495.0 555.0 1793.0 Magnesium (Mg) 307.0 207.0 162.0 390.0 377.0 292.0 105.0 81.0 24.0 83.0 129.0 Iron (Fe) 56.0 28.0 119.0 201.0 157.0 49.0 92.0 172.0 119.0 82.0 321.0 CEC [cmol (+)/kilogram] 22.5 41.2 8.4 20.4 14.3 9.2 8.2 4.6 7.7 4.0 16.7 pH 7.8 7.9 5.7 5.9 7.4 6.5 5.7 5.3 7.0 6.3 5.1 EC (milliSiemens/centimeter) 0.2 0.5 0.2 0.3 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.2 0.4 Organic matter (%) 2.9 1.1 1.8 3.1 2.9 5.0 3.4 3.4 2.1 1.7 3.3 Table 2. Chemical properties of soils from Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Nebraska, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, North Florida (Jay, Fla.), South Florida (Davie, Fla.), Alabama and Mississippi. determine how long various iron fertilizers were able to stay soluble in different soils (2). Eleven soils (Table 1) were selected in an at - tempt to capture the variability in soils across the United States, particularly in regard to pH. e chemical properties of the soils var - ied greatly, and the pH ranged from 5.1 to 7.9 (Table 2). Most soils were collected from sites where turfgrass was growing. e iron prod - ucts (Table 3) were selected because each was derived from a different iron source, and they are all available in the turf market. Each of the 11 soils was weighed in plastic cups and treated with iron from each treat - ment to provide a loading rate of 0.1 pound of iron per ton of soil (50 milligrams/kilo - gram). is amount was approximately equal to five applications of a fertilizer contain -

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