Golf Course Management

AUG 2019

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

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08.19 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 63 gation scheduling included the night before collection of leachate samples. Composite or replicate (6/treatment) soil samples were collected and analyzed for salinity (EC e ), sodium adsorption ratio and nutrients (Ag Source Labs, Lincoln, Neb.) at the time of turf establishment in 2012 and before initial treatment applications and after final treat - ment applications in 2013 and 2014. Results e highest quality was recorded in plots treated with DeSal + Stress Rx + XP Extra Protection. In fact, this was the only treat - ment that resulted in higher quality than the untreated control for both years and accept - able quality of 6 or higher in 2014 (Figure 1). Turfcare NPN also improved turf visual quality in comparison to the control. Dark Green Color Index was higher in compari - son to the control among the same treat- ments that also showed higher turf quality (data not shown). Conversely, ACA 2994 caused bermudagrass discoloration, espe - cially during the early stages of the 2014 ex- periment, and lower DGCI in comparison to the control (data not shown). Although no differences were detected in 2013 (Table 3), soil samples collected at the end of 2014 showed that three treatments were able to lower salinity. ACA 1849 + Gyp - sum, ACA 2994, and DeSal + Stress Rx + XP Extra Protection plots showed lower soil electrical conductivity, sodium adsorption ratio and sodium content in comparison to the control in 2014 (Table 4). Of these three treatments, DeSal + Stress Rx + XP Extra Protection was the only one that also had a positive effect on turf quality. ACA 1849 and gypsum were effective only in combination, whereas neither had a positive effect when applied alone. e positive effect that DeSal + Stress Rx + XP Extra Protection had on bermudagrass was most likely due to benefi - cial effects on soil characteristics (Table 4) and to the supplemental nutrition that the program provided to the turf. Treatment EC e (dS/m) SAR pH Na (Meq/L) Control 7.94 8.41 A-F* 7.3 36.11 A-E ACA 3086 7.29 8.28 A-F 7.4 33.97 A-F ACA 2994 6.41 7.45 EF 7.4 28.64 D-F ACA 1849 6.86 8.50 AE 7.4 33.78 A-F ACA 1849 Gypsum 6.69 7.51 D-F 7.3 29.95 B-F ACA 2786 7.16 8.07 B-F 7.4 32.95 B-F MC TP 5.79 7.82 C-F 7.5 27.99 EF MC TP3 8.90 9.30 A 7.3 42.87 A Crossover 7.09 8.36 A-F 7.4 33.45 A-F Revert 8.18 8.79 A-C 7.4 38.35 A-C SST 8%CA 6.63 7.64 D-F 7.3 29.14 C-F pHAcid Sprayable 8.07 9.05 AB 7.4 39.26 AB Cal Plus 1 6.86 8.01 B-F 7.3 31.82 B-F Cal Plus 2 6.34 7.97 B-F 7.4 29.27 C-F DeSal Stress Rx XP Extra Protection 5.57 7.28 F 7.3 25.65 F Displace Carboplex 7.95 8.83 A-C 7.4 37.94 A-D Elicitor Kelplex 7.54 8.33 A-F 7.3 34.80 A-F SumaGrow 8.11 8.64 A-D 7.3 37.43 A-E Soil System 1 6.12 7.93 B-F 7.5 28.54 D-F UCR001 6.80 7.75 C-F 7.4 30.10 B-F Turfcare NPN Turfcare NPN Turfcare 6-1-2 7.06 8.53 A-E 7.4 34.69 A-F Figure 1. Quality of bermudagrass irrigated with saline water (4.4 deciSiemens/m) treated with either DeSal + Stress Rx + XP Extra Protection, Turfcare NPN, or untreated. Effects of treatments as of October 2013 *Means followed by the same letter in a column are not significantly different. Table 3. Soil electrical conductivity (EC e , in deciSiemens/ meter), sodium absorption ratio (SAR), acidity (pH), and sodium (Na) content (milliequivalents/liter) in October 2013 following application of treatments since April 2013 in Riverside, Calif. DeSal + Stress Rx + XP Extra Protection Turfcare NPN Control 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Apr 3 May 3 June 3 July 3 Aug 3 Sep 3 Oct 3 2014 bermudagrass quality

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