Golf Course Management

JUL 2019

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

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52 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 07.19 walks everywhere from the GIS in Texas and San Diego and GCSAA headquarters in Kan- sas to the halls of our capital in Washington, D.C., and the greens for the Travelers Cham- pionship in Connecticut. I have also represented CAGCS at board meetings for First Tee of Connecticut and the Connecticut State Golf Association. I have tried to make the most of every opportunity that golf and serving our industry can offer without "spoiling" the walk. ƒese stories were not intended simply to share my travels, but more to show how many ways there are to get involved in committee work, networking events and volunteering at the local level and beyond. In that spirit, I encourage you to take your own walks. Regardless of which path you choose, as long as you are reaching out and connecting, I guarantee you will be incredibly thankful you did and will benefit in ways you couldn't have imagined. Marc Weston, CGCS, is president of the Connecticut Association of Golf Course Superintendents and has been superintendent at Indian Hill Country Club in Newington, Conn., for 15 years. Weston also serves on the GCSAA certification committee, is a GCSAA Grassroots Ambassa- dor and is a board member with First Tee of Connecticut. He is a 21-year association member. Leo Feser Award CANDIDATE This article is eligible for the 2020 Leo Feser Award, presented annually since 1977 to the author of the best superintendent-written article published in GCM during the previous year. Superintendents receive a $300 stipend for their articles. Feser Award winners receive an all-expenses-paid trip to the Golf Industry Show, where they are recognized. They also have their names engraved on a plaque permanently displayed at GCSAA headquarters. Scott and I were able to promote the en- vironmental benefits of maintained open space. We shared that golf has a $1.1 billion economic impact to our state, employs 12,000 people and raises over $30 million for charity each year. ƒis experience means so much to me and our industry that I attended National Golf Day again in May. ƒis year, we had more rep- resentation from Connecticut (a group of five participants) and completed another service project along with more than 200 GCSAA volunteers. A highlight for me was continuing to build relationships with professionals from our industry to Capitol Hill. A walk as a volunteer I take another memorable walk each June, when I am able to volunteer at the Travelers Championship on the PGA Tour, hosted by TPC River Highlands in Cromwell, Conn. One recent evening, Ramsay and I were tasked with a walk-mow double-cut of the back-side greens. ƒis was an absolute treat for me, not only because I spent five seasons at River Highlands earlier in my career, but even more so because I had another chance to take a great walk with a friend. ƒe opportunity to volunteer at the Trav- elers Championship is open to all GCSAA members. It is a great way to get involved, network and gain valuable PGA Tour tourna- ment experience. Your own path Over the course of one year, I have taken During his long, and ongoing, walk through his career in golf course management, Marc Weston has col- lected his share of awards and accolades, but he insists those acknowledgments, whether tangible — like the impressive collection of ribbons adorning his GIS badge (above) — or intangible, like his title of president of the Connecticut Association of Golf Course Superintendents, are far less important than the personal growth and development they represent. Weston is pictured with the CAGCS executive board in photo at top right: (from left) Paul Bonini, CGCS, treasurer; Peter Gorman, vice presi - dent; Steve Curry, secretary; Weston; and Eric Morrison, CGCS, past president.

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