Golf Course Management

APR 2019

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

Issue link: http://gcmdigital.gcsaa.org/i/1094722

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78 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 04.19 mowing quality and produced flowers when not mowed. Discussion Although the studies in California and Arizona employed different experimental methods, the combined results provide in - sight into the potential utility and effective- ness of the different plant species for natu- ralized, reduced-input golf course rough. We present a discussion to help superintendents interpret the results for their locations and goals, not to recommend a specific species. On a golf course, green color of vegeta - tion is often an important factor for stake- holders like golfers or homeowners (4). Our research indicates hard fescue, Chewings fes - cue, Molate fescue, Kurapia, bermudagrass and weeping lovegrass exhibited relatively higher measurements of green color. Blue grama had a higher ranking for green color across sites in Arizona but not in California. On the other hand, buffalograss had a higher ranking for green color in California but not in Arizona. Our data suggests green color or reflectance may be influenced by site-specific conditions. A low established plant density or cov - erage may not be desirable for golf course roughs because it leaves exposed soil and provides opportunity for weed encroach - ment (3). Our data reveals that sheep fescue, prairie junegrass, deer grass, sideoats grama, spike dropseed and sand dropseed estab - lished poorly in field conditions and do not show promise for establishment from seed. However, there may be cases where low plant density is desirable for maintaining playabil - ity (1). In reflecting on this research, we realized that additional considerations may be useful to golf course superintendents. We observed that uniform irrigation was required to ob - tain even seed establishment and full plot area coverage. We often think of natural - Arizona results Figure 2. Visual ratings of uniformity, coverage and greenness for naturalized grasses and groundcovers at two locations, Scottsdale and Sun City West, Ariz. 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 Uniformity Coverage Greenness Scottsdale Sun City West Species Buffalograss Plains lovegrass Alkali sacaton Spike dropseed Alkali muhly Sand dropseed Kurapia Blue grama Big galleta Buffalograss Plains lovegrass Alkali sacaton Spike dropseed Alkali muhly Sand dropseed Kurapia Blue grama Big galleta 7.67 7.33 7.33 4.67 5.67 4.33 8 7.33 6.67 1.58 2.15 4.38 3.83 5.13 6.1 6.63 7.23 7.67 7.67 7.33 4.67 6 4.33 9 7.33 5 8 7.67 6 6.67 5.33 8 7 1.5 2.15 4.38 3.95 5.28 6.48 6.6 7.63 5.3 6.2 5.55 5.48 5.1 6.3 6.7 5.25 7.33 6

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