Golf Course Management

APR 2019

Golf Course Management magazine is dedicated to advancing the golf course superintendent profession and helping GCSAA members achieve career success.

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76 GOLF COURSE MANAGEMENT 04.19 Data were collected to measure estab- lishment success and stand health with the following visual ratings: greenness, percent ground cover and growth uniformity. e quality ratings were collected on a 1-9 scale, with 9 representing excellent quality and 1 representing poor quality. Greenness ratings were collected on a similar 1-9 scale, with 9 representing dark green and 1 representing brown color. In this study, "acceptable" en - tries had ratings greater than 5. We rated the visual ground cover of plots on a scale of 0 to 10, with 0 representing no vegetative cover and 10 representing complete coverage of the area with no visible soil. e weekly data were combined for each site. Results Evaluation of low-maintenance grasses is difficult because there is no consensus on what is ideal. We evaluated grasses using dif - ferent criteria in each state. In California, we examined grass density, height and NDVI measurements, while in Arizona, we exam - ined uniformity, coverage and greenness. e results of this research are presented by state in Figures 1 and 2. California Top-ranking entries for NDVI were the bermudagrass, buffalograss, weeping love - grass and the fine-leaved fescues, except sheep fescue. Established plant density (plants per area) was lowest for deer grass, sideoats grama, prairie junegrass and sheep fescue. At maximum stand height, weeping lovegrass, purple threeawn, sideoats grama, blue grama, alkali sacaton, California brome and spike bentgrass reached relatively taller heights (greater than 12 inches [30 centimeters]). Arizona Big galleta, blue grama and Kurapia ex - hibited the best uniformity and coverage over both locations in Arizona. Kurapia, alkali sacaton, blue grama, plains lovegrass and al - kali muhly entries remained green through- out the year. At the Scottsdale site, Kurapia, plains lovegrass, alkali sacaton, blue grama, big galleta and alkali muhly performed well for all quality parameters measured. At the Sun City West site, big galleta, blue grama, Kurapia and sand dropseed performed well for all quality parameters measured. Field observations at both sites indicated that Kurapia was aggressive and vigorous as a groundcover. Kurapia also exhibited the best (Top) Naturalized grasses and groundcover species trial established in Scottsdale, Ariz., in spring 2016. (Bottom) Naturalized grasses and groundcover species trial established in Sun City West, Ariz., in summer 2017. Photos by Kai Umeda

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